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Municipal Frequently Asked Questions

As the adult-use marketplace begins to unfold in Vermont, the Cannabis Control Board has received a number of questions from municipalities relating to their regulatory authority. Some of the more commonly asked questions are answered below. Don't see your question answered? Contact us!

What are the key Adult Use and Medical Use Laws? What is the role and authority of the CCB? What are the license types and tiers?
Can a licensee hold more than one license? Does one license allow the licensee to operate multiple locations? Can "stacked" or "vertically integrated" licenses operate at the same location?
Can multiple licensees operate at the same location? After a license is issued, when can a licensee begin operating? What are the rules, and where do we find them? How do we provide comments?
Will the CCB provide additional guidance or training to towns on the rules? What is the extent of municipal authority to regulate cannabis businesses? What is Opt-In? Is opt-in always optional?
If we don't opt-in, does that mean no cannabis establishment can operate in our town? What is a local Cannabis Control Commission? How does a town form a local commission, and who is on it? 
What authority does the local Cannabis Control Commission have? What discretion does a town have to revoke, suspend or deny a license? Can a municipality indefinitely delay the review of a local license?
Is local approval required before issuing a license from the C.C.B.? Will municipalities approve licenses for non-retail license applicants, such as outdoor cultivation? Can cannabis establishments only operate in designated commercial zones?
 Is cannabis an agricultural product? If not, does that affect the zoning status of cannabis businesses? Does state law or the Board’s rules ever effect a local zoning designation? Can a local government limit the types of licenses it issues?
Are there fees for Cannabis Establishments for local control licenses? What role does the local cannabis control commission have in deciding how local options taxes or the cannabis excise tax is spent? What role do other town governing bodies have in zoning cannabis establishments?
What role does a local cannabis control commission have in creating buffer zones or other rules and restrictions on cannabis establishments? Do the Board’s buffer zones apply to license types other than retail establishments? Can a town allow only social equity licenses?
What does it mean if an applicant has a provisional license from the CCB? Are all provisional licenses converted to operating licenses? Does the local government have to follow the same licensing priority as the CCB? What impact does the priority of licensure have on local permitting?
What types of documents will cannabis establishments need from the town for their CCB application? Can cannabis establishments make donations to town parks or other local funds? What if a municipality’s local water and wastewater requirements are more stringent than the CCB's rules?
Can a local government create additional rules for sustainability, energy, waste disposal or other environmental concerns?  What if our town already has more stringent bylaws? Will local governments be notified of changes in control of a business? Will the CCB inspect cannabis businesses?
How will the Board receive complaints about cannabis establishments? How will the Board investigate cannabis establishments? How could cannabis establishments be sanctioned for violations?
Will a local police force know if cannabis is being lawfully transported through a town? What authority do local or state police have to stop and inspect licensed transportation vehicles? How much cannabis can an individual purchase from a retail cannabis business?
What type of security is required? How will local law enforcement be notified of theft, property damage or loss? How many people can be in a retail cannabis establishment at once? Will towns receive a portion of the excise tax to cover costs associated with cannabis establishments?
What are the fees a municipality may charge for reviewing CE applications? What is the town’s role in collecting fees? Does a local option tax apply to cannabis sales?
Can a town adopt a local option tax only for cannabis sales? Does a meals and rooms tax apply to cannabis sales? What public health and education measures are in place with respect to a legalized adult-use cannabis market?
Will local police, fire, and rescue forces receive additional training related to cannabis overconsumption? What is the State doing to keep our roadways safe? Are novel cannabinoids such as Delta-8 synthetic Delta-9 regulated by the CCB? Can these products be sold in non-licensed establishments such as gas stations?
Is cannabis consumption, such as smoking, vaping, or eating edibles, allowed in public? Can local governments limit where cannabis is consumed? Can cannabis be consumed on private property such as a restaurant, outdoor common area of an apartment complex, concert venues, or in a resident's private yard/porch/driveway?
What type of public education on cannabis use will the CCB provide? Can employees with Commercial Driver’s Licenses (CDLs) use cannabis now that it is legal in Vermont? How do I contact the CCB? My question isn't answered here.

What are the key Adult Use and Medical Use Laws?

Cannabis is a Schedule I controlled substance under The Controlled Substances Act.  As cannabis is federally illegal, the CCB's authority extends only to the regulation of cannabis in the State of Vermont. 

Laws that govern therapeutic cannabis were enacted in 2004.  Laws that govern adult-use cannabis were enacted in 2020 and 2021 with Acts 164 and 62.  Act 164 also substantially changes the Medical Marijuana Program, moving the program from the Department of Public Safety to the Cannabis Control Board effective January of 2022.  Medical Marijuana Program details are here. The Laws and rules for governing cannabis in the state of Vermont can be found here.  

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What is the role and authority of the CCB?

The Legislature has tasked the Board with "safely, equitably, and effectively implementing and administering the laws enabling adult use and medical use cannabis in Vermont" 7 V.S.A. § 843.

The role of the Board includes implementing the laws governing the adult-use cannabis program, crafting all rules pertaining to the licensing and oversight of cannabis businesses, and overseeing compliance and enforcement of the program.  

The CCB has also assumed responsibility for administering the medical cannabis program, formerly housed within the Department of Public Safety. This program oversees and administers Vermont’s therapeutic cannabis program, including dispensaries and the patient and caregiver registry. 

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What are the license types and tiers?

There are six license types – cultivators, manufacturers, retailers, wholesalers, testing laboratories, and integrated licenses. Of these, cultivators and manufacturer licenses are broken down into tiers.

More information on licenses, along with how much it costs to apply and be licensed by the Board, can be found on our Application and Licensing Fees Guidance Document.

Only retail and integrated licensees may sell cannabis to the general public.

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Can a licensee hold more than one license? 

Yes.  Except for the Integrated Licenses, licensees may hold more than one license.  However, they may not hold more than one of any type of license.  This is referred to as "stacking" or "vertically integrating" licenses.

Example:  One licensee may hold one retailer license, one cultivator license, one manufacturer license, and one wholesaler license.  However, one licensee may not hold two retailer licenses or two cultivator licenses. 

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Does one license allow the licensee to operate multiple locations? 

No.  There can only be one location per license. 

Example: A retail licensee cannot open multiple retail locations within the State. 

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Can "stacked" or "vertically integrated" licenses operate at the same location?

The proposed rules allow for "stacked" or 'vertically integrated" licenses to operate in the same location, as long as the operation for each license meets all of the requirements for each individual license held.  The licensee must abide by all of the operational rules for each license and must meet all of the local zoning bylaws and local ordinances for that location.  A "stacked" or "vertically integrated" licensee may not operate a retail license portion of a license in town that has not opted-in. 

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Can multiple licensees operate at the same location?

Except for retail licenses, yes. The rules allow multiple licenses to operate at the same location.  However, specific operational requirements regarding co-location are included in Board Rule 2.2.18.

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After a license is issued, when can a licensee begin operating?

Licensees may begin operating as soon as their license is approved if they are in compliance with all relevant state and local regulations. 

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What are the rules, and where do we find them? How do we provide comments?

Rules can be found here:

ccb.vermont.gov/laws-rules-and-regulations

Comments can be provided through the Board’s public input form, or during the public comment period of any one of the Board's public meetings.

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Will the CCB provide additional guidance or training to towns on the rules?

Yes, the CCB has developed these FAQs to assist towns, and has also created other policy guidance documents, available here:

https://ccb.vermont.gov/guidance

Town officials can also reach out to the CCB at CCB.Info@vermont.gov or 802-828-1010, ext. 3 for guidance.

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What is the extent of municipal authority to regulate cannabis businesses?

General rule:  

  • Cannabis establishments are subject to the same zoning rules and municipal ordinances that apply to any business.  Beyond municipalities' general authority to create and enforce zoning rules or ordinances that apply to all businesses, they do not have the power to create special rules for cannabis establishments. 

A municipality may:  

  • Regulate cannabis establishments to the same extent they may regulate any other business under their authority to create zoning bylaws in 24 V.S.A. § 4414 and their authority to regulate signs or public nuisances in 24 V.S.A. § 2291. Municipalities may regulate any cannabis establishment license type in this manner. 7 V.S.A. § 863(b).  

A municipality may not: 

  • Regulate cannabis establishments to any greater extent than they could any other business. 7 V.S.A. § 863(d).  
  • Place conditions on the operation of cannabis establishments, or create special rules for them, that is not within their zoning authority under 24 V.S.A. § 4414 or their authority to regulate signs or public nuisances under 24 V.S.A. § 22917 V.S.A. § 863(d)(2). 

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What is Opt-In? Is opt-in always optional?

Before a retail establishment or the retail portion of an integrated license can operate in a town, the town must "opt-in." Opt-in votes can be held at a special election or Town Meeting Day as long as the vote is warned for that purpose. 

There is no sunset to the opt-in provision.  There is no date at which all towns automatically opt-in.  Towns may choose to opt-in now or later. 

Towns may rescind the opt-in vote.  Such a vote will not apply to any retail establishment operating in the municipality at the time of the opt-out vote. 7 V.S.A. § 863(a)(2). 

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If we don't opt-in, does that mean no cannabis establishment can operate in our town?

No. The opt-in requirement applies only to retail cannabis businesses and the retail portion of an integrated license.  Even if a town does not opt-in, other cannabis establishments may still operate in the town as long as they meet all of the local zoning and ordinances, obtain all of the appropriate permits, and receive a license from the CCB.  These other license types include cultivators, wholesalers, manufacturers, and testing laboratories, none of which require an opt-in vote to operate in a municipality. 7 V.S.A. § 863(a)(1).

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What is a local Cannabis Control Commission?

7 V.S.A. § 863(b) provides that: "Any municipality that hosts any cannabis establishment may establish a cannabis control commission composed of commissioners who may be members of the municipal legislative body." 

Any municipality may form a local cannabis control commission.  However, creating a local cannabis control commission is not required for a cannabis establishment to operate in any town.  Municipalities must give notice to the Cannabis Control Board if they have formed a local cannabis control commission. 

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How does a town form a local commission, and who is on it? 

Municipalities that choose to form a local commission may seat members of their legislative body on the commission or decide to create a commission with members of the community that are not part of the legislative body.  The composition of the local commission is up to the local government. How a commission is formed at the local level depends on your local government's policy practices. 

More information on local cannabis commissions, how to form one, and how to inform the Board of your town's choice to form one, may be found on our guidance page:

https://ccb.vermont.gov/guidance

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What authority does the local Cannabis Control Commission have?

The local commission may issue and administer local control licenses and condition licenses to comply with bylaws under 24 V.S.A. §4414 and ordinances regulating signs or public nuisances under 24 V.S.A. §2291. The local commission may also deny, suspend, or revoke a local control license if it violates conditions placed on the license.  Local commissions must inform the Board of such actions. 

The conditions that local control commissions can place on a license are limited to compliance with zoning bylaws under 24 V.S.A. §4414 and compliance with ordinances regulating signs or public nuisances under 24 V.S.A. §2291. Placing additional conditions on a local license, or suspending or revoking licenses for any reason other than the allowable conditions, is a violation of state law. 

More information on local cannabis commissions, how to form one, and how to inform the Board of your town's choice to form one, may be found on our guidance page:

https://ccb.vermont.gov/guidance

Towns may also contact the Board in advance of the revocation or suspension.  Please note that while the Board has the authority to grant and revoke state licenses and ensure compliance with the State's rules governing Cannabis Establishments, the Board does not have the authority to enforce compliance with local zoning bylaws. 

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What discretion does a town have to revoke, suspend or deny a license?

If the town creates a local cannabis control commission, the commission may suspend or revoke a local license for failure to comply with zoning bylaws under 24 V.S.A. §4414 or with ordinances regulating signs or public nuisances under 24 V.S.A. §2291.

The conditions that local control commissions can place on a license are limited to compliance with zoning bylaws under 24 V.S.A. §4414 and compliance with ordinances regulating signs or public nuisances under 24 V.S.A. §2291. Placing additional conditions on a local license, or suspending or revoking licenses for any reason other than the allowable conditions, is a violation of state law. 

More information about municipal authority can be found in the Board’s municipal guidance document, available on the Board’s website, linked here.

If a town does not create a local commission, the local license provisions do not apply.  However, all other health, life, safety, zoning, and ordinance enforcement mechanisms remain in force.  Should an establishment not comply with local rules, the local government may still follow processes as it would with any other type of business.

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Can a municipality indefinitely delay the review of a local license?

No. Local governments must process all permits and local licenses promptly and consistent with other statutory requirements. An indefinite delay would exceed the authority granted under 7 VSA 863.

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Is local approval required before issuing a license from the C.C.B.? 

If the town has created a local commission, yes. If a town chooses not to create a local commission, no such approval is required. 

Even if no local cannabis control commission exists, all cannabis establishments must comply with local regulations applicable to any business.

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Will municipalities approve licenses for non-retail license applicants, such as outdoor cultivation?

Yes. If the local government chooses to create a local control commission, that body will review all types of licenses.  If no local control commission is in place, the establishment will still need to follow all the typical processes for opening a business in the town. Still, a specific local cannabis license will not be required.  

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Can cannabis establishments only operate in designated commercial zones?

No, there is nothing in state law or the Board’s rules requiring cannabis establishments to operate within a commercial zoning designation.

A town’s zoning bylaws may require a particular cannabis establishment to be within a commercially zoned district, but that will result solely from the application of the town’s bylaws and not from any requirement in state law.

Nowhere does Vermont law state that cannabis is a “commercial product,” and nowhere does the law require that cannabis businesses operate within designated commercial zones. 

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Is cannabis an agricultural product? If not, does that affect the zoning status of cannabis businesses?  

No and no.

State law provides that cannabis is not an agricultural product and that cannabis cultivators will not be regulated as farming. 7 V.S.A. § 869. As a result, cannabis and cannabis cultivators will not receive certain tax and regulatory benefits that farms and agricultural products are eligible to receive. 

These provisions are not relevant to zoning laws and have no effect on zoning. A municipality’s zoning rules may require a certain type of cannabis establishment to operate within a particular zoning designation, but that will be determined on a town-by-town and business-by-business basis.

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Does state law or the Board’s rules ever effect a local zoning designation?

No, state cannabis law and Board’s rules do not determine any zoning designation. There is nothing in state law or the Board’s rules requiring cannabis establishments to operate within a commercial zoning designation or any other zoning designation.

A town’s zoning bylaws may require a particular cannabis establishment to be within a specifically zoned district, but that will result solely from the application of the town’s bylaws and not from any requirement in state law.

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Can a local government limit the types of licenses it issues?

Example: Can an opt-in town only allow tier 1 retail licenses? Can a town allow for manufacturing licenses but not cultivation licenses?

No. Other than retail and the retail portion of an integrated license, which requires a town to opt-in, towns may not specifically limit the types of licensees operating in their town. 

A municipality may regulate cannabis establishments to the same extent they may regulate any other business under their authority to create zoning bylaws in 24 V.S.A. § 4414 and their authority to regulate signs or public nuisances in 24 V.S.A. § 2291. Municipalities may regulate any cannabis establishment license type in this manner. 7 V.S.A. § 863(b).

More information about municipal authority can be found in the Board’s municipal guidance document, available on the Board’s website, linked here.

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Are there fees for Cannabis Establishments for local control licenses? 

Yes. There is a local licensing fee of $100, to be paid by the licensed cannabis establishment to the Board. The Board will then distribute that fee to the town in which the cannabis establishment is licensed.

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What role does the local cannabis control commission have in deciding how local options taxes or the cannabis excise tax is spent?

The local commission has no direct authority related to appropriations of the State's Cannabis Excise Tax.  The authority to direct the revenue from the local options tax or any fees for local license processing is up to the town.

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What role do other town governing bodies have in zoning cannabis establishments?

A municipality may regulate cannabis establishments to the same extent they may regulate any other business under their authority to create zoning bylaws in 24 V.S.A. § 4414 and their authority to regulate signs or public nuisances in 24 V.S.A. § 2291. Municipalities may regulate any cannabis establishment license type in this manner. 7 V.S.A. § 863(b).

For example, an establishment that wishes to renovate or construct a building must obtain all the proper local approvals and permits, just as any other business would. 

Per 7 V.S.A. §863(d), towns may not create local bylaws or ordinances that have the effect of prohibiting the operation of cannabis establishments.

More information about municipal authority can be found in the Board’s municipal guidance document, available on the Board’s website, linked here.

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What role does a local cannabis control commission have in creating buffer zones or other rules and restrictions on cannabis establishments?

Under Board rules, a retail cannabis establishment cannot operate in any location where it would be a violation of the drug-free school zone law to sell a regulated drug. This means cannabis retailers cannot operate if the store would be on a property that abuts a school property and if the retail operations would occur within 500 feet of the school property.  

A municipality may regulate the location of cannabis establishments to the same extent it may regulate the placement of any other business under its zoning powers, but a municipality does not have authority to go beyond its general zoning power under 24 V.S.A. § 4414 in creating buffer zones that could apply to cannabis establishments. 

More information about municipal authority can be found in the Board’s municipal guidance document, available on the Board’s website, linked here.

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Do the Board’s buffer zones apply to license types other than retail establishments?

The Board’s buffer zone rule applies only to retail cannabis establishments and the retail portion of an integrated licenses.

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Can a town allow only social equity licenses?

The Board has prioritized the processing of social equity applications at the state level and is working with partners and affected communities to establish programs that will provide additional support for social equity applicants. 

Municipalities, however, may not condition local license decisions upon social equity criteria. Nevertheless, towns are encouraged to support social equity applicants. For example, they may choose to hold local workshops or informational sessions to assist local applicants in moving through the local permitting and license process.

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What does it mean if an applicant has a provisional license from the CCB?

If an applicant has received a provisional license (also known as pre-qualification) from the Board, it means the applicant has submitted an initial application and is provisionally approved for a license.  A provisional license does not allow an applicant to begin operations, nor does it guarantee that an applicant will receive a final license to operate a cannabis establishment. 

The provision licensing program is intended to allow interested applicants an opportunity to begin the application process and to have a provisional approval that may allow them to more effectively engage in commercial activities like contracting, negotiating potential leases with commercial building owners, and securing funding.  The provisional license does not obligate the local government to approve a local license or any other type of permit.

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Are all provisional licenses converted to operating licenses?

No.  Provisional licensees will still be required to submit a final application for the Board's approval.

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Does the local government have to follow the same licensing priority as the CCB? What impact does the priority of licensure have on local permitting?

7 V.S.A. § 903(a) outlines a system of priorities for the Board when issuing licenses.  This does not directly impact the processing of local licenses.  However, local governments are encouraged to engage with prospective cannabis establishments to discuss shared community values. Further, towns are encouraged to support Social Equity Applicants. They may choose to hold local workshops or informational sessions to assist local applicants in moving through the local permitting and license process. 

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What types of documents will cannabis establishments need from the town for their CCB application?

The Board is in the process of determining the details of the license application submittal.  While the rules outline the general requirements for license applications, the Board is still determining the specifics of how applications, and proof of local approval, will be submitted. Once the Board has decided on this process information will be clearly displayed on the Board’s website.

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Can cannabis establishments make donations to town parks or other local funds?

There is no law or rule requiring that cannabis establishments donate funds to local parks or other funds. A town does not have the authority to condition a license on any donation. It is up to the town and local C.E.s to determine this type of donation.  Further, it is important for the town to review the warning and advertising sections of proposed Board Rule 2 for limitations on the types of advertising and signage allowed in exchange for such a donation.   

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What if a municipality’s local water and wastewater requirements are more stringent than the CCB's rules?

Larger cultivators who operate on municipal water will be required to obtain a notice that the municipal water authority has capacity to serve the cultivation operation. 

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Can a local government create additional rules for sustainability, energy, waste disposal or other environmental concerns?  What if our town already has more stringent bylaws?

Cannabis establishments must abide by all generally applicable environmental regulations, whether state or municipal.  The Board will require some additional environmental standards, as provided in Board Rule 2, available at the CCB’s website

Municipalities do not have authority to implement special environmental rules for cannabis establishments beyond their authority to create zoning bylaws with general effect.

More information about municipal authority can be found in the Board’s municipal guidance document, available on the Board’s website, linked here.

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Will local governments be notified of changes in control of a business?

Cannabis establishments are required to notify the Board of changes of ownership and control. Information about ownership will be public. 

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Will the CCB inspect cannabis businesses?

Yes, the CCB will aim to inspect each cannabis establishment annually.

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How will the Board receive complaints about cannabis establishments?

The Board will have a system in place to receive reports from anyone, including municipal officials, regarding suspected issues and violations of a license holder. The Board will investigate and inform local officials as necessary of any violations and enforcement actions.  

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How will the Board investigate cannabis establishments?

The Board will have enforcement personnel who can investigate complaints about the operations of any cannabis establishment and recommend sanctions to the Board, if appropriate.  

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How could cannabis establishments be sanctioned for violations?

The Board has authority to prescribe administrative and civil penalties to a license holder or other person who violates the rules or laws regulating the legal cannabis market. These penalties could range from a fine to a suspension or revocation of a license, depending on the type and severity of violation. The Board will inform a municipality of a suspension or revocation of a license after it has reached a final judgment. 

More information about the Board’s enforcement processes can be found in Board Rule 4, available at the Board’s website.  

Municipalities retain authority to enforce ordinances regarding “public nuisances” under 24 V.S.A. § 2291. For more information on a municipality’s regulatory power with respect to cannabis businesses please see subsection B of section IV. 

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Will a local police force know if cannabis is being lawfully transported through a town?

If transported in accordance with Board rules, cannabis transports will not be apparent to anyone outside of the cannabis businesses involved. Information about transports will not generally be shared with law enforcement each time a transfer happens, but there will be strict rules in place regarding the transfer of cannabis between cannabis businesses.

Among other regulations, if cannabis is being transported by vehicle between licensees, it needs to be done in an unmarked car to avoid unnecessary attention and threats of theft or diversion. Cannabis must be entered and tracked in inventory tracking software that indicates a transfer between license holders. Every time cannabis is transported, a manifest must be generated containing detailed information such as approximate time of departure, destination, estimated time of arrival, the transportation vehicle’s make, model, and license plate number, and signature of an employee of the cannabis establishment receiving the product. If there is an issue in transport, the Board must be notified within 24 hours, and the Board will contact officials as appropriate.

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What authority do local or state police have to stop and inspect licensed transportation vehicles?

None, unless the driver has committed a moving violation or some other offense.

Cannabis establishment employees who are transporting cannabis must always have documentation on them demonstrating their lawful employment with a cannabis establishment.  

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How much cannabis can an individual purchase from a retail cannabis business?

A person 21 years of age or older may purchase up to one once of cannabis per transaction at a cannabis retail establishment and possess up to one ounce of cannabis on their person. 18 V.S.A. § 4230a. It is a civil violation for a person under 21 years of age to possess any amount of cannabis. 18 V.S.A. § 4230b.  

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What type of security is required? How will local law enforcement be notified of theft, property damage or loss?

The Board has security requirements for all cannabis businesses, though the requirements vary depending on license type. License holders are required to report to the Board any issues of theft, property damage or loss. The Board will notify appropriate law enforcement and local officials as appropriate. 

More information about the Board’s security requirements can be found in Board Rule 2, available at the Board’s website.  

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How many people can be in a retail cannabis establishment at once?

The CCB does not intend to regulate maximum occupancy at cannabis establishments, however all establishments will be subject to all relevant fire and building safety codes.  

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Will towns receive a portion of the excise tax to cover costs associated with cannabis establishments?

The excise tax on cannabis products will be 14%. Under current law, municipalities do not receive a portion of the cannabis excise tax. In its October 15, 2021 report to the legislature the Board recommended that municipalities get a portion of the excise tax.  

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What are the fees a municipality may charge for reviewing CE applications?

The legislature has not approved specific local cannabis fee rates. The CCB has recommended that the legislature approve a local fee of up to $500 or, alternatively, allow municipalities to use the Uniform Fee Schedule set forth in 1 VSA 316(d) to charge applicants a variable fee based on the actual amount of time spent processing an application.  

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What is the town’s role in collecting fees?

Under Act 162 of 2020, the CCB would collect local license fees at the time an applicant applies or renews their application with the CCB and would pay them on a quarterly basis to the municipality in which the fees were collected. 7 V.S.A. § 846. This guidance will be updated with any process changes that may be legislated in 2022.  

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Does a local option tax apply to cannabis sales?

The Vermont Sales and Use Tax will apply to the retail sale of cannabis products in Vermont. Municipalities that have such a tax will receive local option tax revenue on retail sales of cannabis. The sales and use tax applies to all cannabis products.  

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Can a town adopt a local option tax only for cannabis sales?

Municipalities cannot add a local option sales tax solely for cannabis products. Municipalities that have a local option sales tax cannot exempt cannabis products from that tax. Municipalities must tax cannabis products as they would as any other good.  

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Does a meals and rooms tax apply to cannabis sales?

Meals and Rooms taxes do not apply to cannabis products, nor do they apply to edible cannabis products. Therefore, a local option tax on meals would not apply to the retail sale of any cannabis products.  

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What public health and education measures are in place with respect to a legalized adult-use cannabis market?

The CCB has developed detailed regulations to ensure that cannabis and cannabis products that are being sold at retail establishments are tested and free from harmful adulterants. The CCB has broad authority to stop sales and recall harmful products if identified.  

All cannabis and cannabis products will be sold in opaque, child-resistant packaging that will be labeled with standard health warnings and symbols approved by the Vermont Department of Health.  

The CCB will require retailers to provide customers an educational flyer at the point of sale that includes health and safety information. This flyer will be developed by the Department of Health and contain current, evidence-based information on the health effects of cannabis. Additionally, the Department of Heath will have access to 30% of the cannabis excise tax (capped at $10,000,000 annually) to fund substance misuse prevention programming throughout the state.  

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Will local police, fire, and rescue forces receive additional training related to cannabis overconsumption?

While the CCB does not have the authority to require additional trainings related to cannabis consumption for local police, fire, and rescue forces, the CCB will require training for employees for cannabis establishments that includes identifying signs of overconsumption.  

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What is the State doing to keep our roadways safe?

The Vermont Criminal Justice Council added Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement (ARIDE) to the mandatory curriculum at the Vermont Police Academy in 2015, meaning all law enforcement officers who have graduated since 2015 are trained to detect drivers impaired by any substance, including cannabis. The Vermont Criminal Justice Training Council is currently working to train all remaining law enforcement officers that are involved in highway safety on ARIDE standards.  

In addition to ARIDE-trained officers, Vermont utilizes approximately 45-55 trained Drug Recognition Experts (DRE) that are geographically dispersed around the state. DREs are specialized law enforcement officers that have completed a 40-hour course and field certification designed to detect not only impairment but also the impairing substance(s) a driver has consumed.  

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Are novel cannabinoids such as Delta-8 synthetic Delta-9 regulated by the CCB? Can these products be sold in non-licensed establishments such as gas stations?

Currently, many intoxicating cannabinoids, including Delta-8 and synthetic Delta-9, exist in a regulatory grey area. The CCB has asked the legislature to grant it the authority to regulate all intoxicating cannabinoids to ensure that they are only sold to those authorized to purchase them, and that they are safe for consumers and patients. If granted the authority, the CCB intends to create a product registration process so that any new product containing a novel intoxicating cannabinoid will be reviewed, including its packaging, labeling, ingredients, and health effects, before being released to the public.  

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Is cannabis consumption, such as smoking, vaping, or eating edibles, allowed in public?

Public consumption of cannabis in any form is prohibited by state law and is subject to civil penalties capped at $100 for a first offense, $200 for a second offense, and $500 for a third or subsequent offense.

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Can local governments limit where cannabis is consumed?

Under state law, cannabis consumption is prohibited in any public place. A public place means any street, alley, park, sidewalk, public building other than individual dwellings, any place of public accommodation, and any place where the use or possession of a lighted tobacco product, tobacco product, or tobacco substitute is prohibited by law. Places of public accommodation can include restaurants, stores, or other facilities at which services, facilities, goods, privileges, advantages, benefits, or accommodations are offered to the general public. 18 V.S.A. § 4230a.  

Public consumption of cannabis in any form is prohibited and is subject to civil penalties capped at $100 for a first offense, $200 for a second offense, and $500 for a third or subsequent offense. 18 V.S.A. § 4230a.  

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Can cannabis be consumed on private property such as a restaurant, outdoor common area of an apartment complex, concert venues, or in a resident's private yard/porch/driveway?

Cannabis consumption is prohibited by state law in all places of public accommodation, and some places of public accommodation can be private property. Places of public accommodation can include restaurants, stores, or other facilities at which services, facilities, goods, privileges, advantages, benefits, or accommodations are offered to the general public.

Cannabis consumption on private property that is not a place of public accommodation is not prohibited by state law.

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What type of public education on cannabis use will the CCB provide?

The CCB will require retailers to provide customers an educational flyer at the point of sale that includes health and safety information. This flyer will be developed by the Department of Health and contain current, evidence-based information on the health effects of cannabis. Additionally, the Department of Heath will have access to 30% of the cannabis excise tax (capped at $10,000,000 annually) to fund substance misuse prevention programming throughout the state.

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Can employees with Commercial Driver’s Licenses (CDLs) use cannabis now that it is legal in Vermont?

The requirements for getting and keeping a Commercial Driver’s License are not impacted by the legalization of cannabis in Vermont. Any substance that was prohibited for use by CDL holders prior to cannabis legalization in Vermont is still prohibited.  

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How do I contact the CCB? My question isn't answered here.

Please visit our contact us page to find out how to best direct your question.

https://ccb.vermont.gov/contact

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